Dealing with a traffic explosion. (not of the automotive type).

March 16, 20080 Comments
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So for those of you who aren’t here via del.icio.us or Yahoo’s UI blog, I put a post out about rich text editors that became a little popular with some folk. So what plan’s do you have in place to capitalise on new traffic on your website? I’ll be honest, it was unexpected for me, and I didn’t expect the article to get much of a mention. But we had the pleasure of company from two people from Yahoo , an established technical Author, and various other web dignitaries. In facto, my traffic before looked a little like this….

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I’ve decided to put this up here, mainly because I’ve never really seen too many people putting out many blog posts about how poorly their traffic / blog was doing before, I guess its all a bit cloak and dagger in the webmaster world. There are plenty of people willing to post traffic stats when it is plentiful, not so many when you are standing a bit still. We are a little embarrassed I suppose, or we feel its market sensitive whenever web traffic isn’t going as it should be, but alas this is the first step I’ve personally made in the right direction, and is the single biggest explosion of traffic I’ve ever managed to get to a website.

So, a little daunted as to where to go from here, I had a bit of a brainstorming session as the best ways to keep the momentum going with the site. Easier said than done in most cases, but maybe if you on the receiving end of a significant traffic explosion, maybe you can take something from this.

Send a personal thanks to your readers

These are the people that have made you feel all warm and fuzzy inside, and I went to some lengths to get the email addresses of some of the people in my comments. Share the love, and let them know you care.

Follow up with a super post, again thanking your visitors.

Making people feel at home on your site, and that they are valued is extremely important in building trust, and repeat visits. So to all of you out there that have visited, I love you all.

Keep posting regular and decent content.
Kinda goes without saying, but keep your posts quality high, and relevant. Chances are if you’ve managed to get people to stop and read something, you are already half way there anyways. Keep it as regular as you can without losing your life to your site. You can have blog burn out, make sure it doesn’t happen, and dont post just for the sake of posting.

Prominant RSS button positioning.

Make sure your RSSsubscribe button is visible, and the position on page is good. Generally a subscribe works better at the bottom of posts, but I feel that placement there (on my site) it is too contrived. I don’t really want to ram it down people’s throats, if they are savvy, they’ll find the RSS button. One thing you can do is in the thank you email, drop in your link to your RSS feed, and ask them nicely to subscribe. Remember RSS = Repeat visitors.

Make sure your server is capable of coping

Rubbish hosting = business down the pan. The same holds true for a blog, make sure your host is stable and does blow up if someone sneezes. Bedroom hosting companies are the worst offender here.

Link to your other popular bits and bobs

Have a look about your site and decide what is good content. List bait or linkbait type posts may work well in attracting visitors but aren’t always the best in getting them to stay. You have to think about why your visitors are reading, and how best to talk to them. Personally I try my best to use my natural wit and charm, and try to give them the odd giggle if at all possible.

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About the Author ()

Paul is a regular 30 year old web bloke / programmer with a penchant for online marketing. This blog is a personal outlet, with an eclectic mix of articles.

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