10 inspiring HTML5 sites you really should see.

September 11, 20111 Comment
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone

Pupunzi

URL: http://pupunzi.com

Matteo Bicocchi is an Italian graphic designer – and co-founder of Open Lab Matteo is a bit of a javascript wizard, and he’s used this experience along with the power of HTML5 to create a truly engaging experience on Pupunzi.com – where his work and creativity are showcased perfectly. The fluidity of the interface is impressive, and even on slower machines you can see why HTML is being pipped as the new Flash.

Bifter

 URL: http://www.bifter.co.uk/

Bifter is an SVG Comic that also utilises HTML5, CSS3 and RDFa as well as remaining screenreader friendly. Best of all, it has a throw back to my childhood making a cameo appearance in one of the issues. Desperate Dan. This, along with the clever code running alongside it make it a must view HTML5 website for any budding developer.

Emberwind

URL: http://www.timetrap.se/emberwind/

The grand city is under siege by mischievous hordes of gremlins and only a stubby little gnome watchman named Kindle Elderwood can answer the call for a hero. Sail through the clouds on your ancient snow owl and deploy your cane of justice to save the kingdom from the underworld!  Created by the Opera team, this HTML5 with WebGL port of the game showcases what is possible in the browser.

UCE Mag

URL: http://ucemag.com/scarlet-fever/

UCE is a 100% digital “eco-luxurious” magazine dedicated to fashion, design and culture. The HTML5 implementation of the entire magazine is something of a spectacle in its own right, with an intuitive slideshow approach to the entire design of the site.

The Wilderness Downtown

URL: http://thewildernessdowntown.com/

Adobe ExpressiveWeb

URL: http://beta.theexpressiveweb.com/

Adobe’s expressive web page showcases some of the capabilities of HTML5, including a few quirky animations which you’ll have fun playing with. The site also includes resources for developers and underlines their commitment to the technology as we wave a slow goodbye to Flash.

HTML5 Readiness

URL: http://html5readiness.com/

HTML5 Readiness keeps abreast of browser developments all via a neat interactive chart that allows you see visually what HTML5 and CSS3 features browsers can support, and what will have to wait. Interestingly its keeping historic data so you can see how the browsers evolve over time.

20 things I learned

URL: http://www.20thingsilearned.com/en-GB

Created by a number of developers- this HTML5 application provides an interactive book, built in javascript and HTML that actually allows you to turn the pages as if it were a real book.  Try flipping through a couple of pages for a read, then come back – and you can pick up where you left off. This is how e-books are meant to be. Beautiful.

Deaxon

URL: http://deaxon.com/

Deaxon is the playground of Benjamin De Cock – have a look at the source code on this one, and marvel at the use of CSS3 transitions.

All is not lost – OK GO

URL: http://www.allisnotlo.st/index_en.html

Choreograph the dance to OK Go’s song “All is not lost” using this awesome interactive site built with help from the Google Chrome team.

Filed in: Web Design
Tagged with:

About the Author ()

Paul is a regular 30 year old web bloke / programmer with a penchant for online marketing. This blog is a personal outlet, with an eclectic mix of articles.

Comments (1)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Thanks for the links, i enjoyed them very much!

Leave a Reply

Back to Top